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The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is responsible for encouraging the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of all data that is held by the credit reporting bureaus in the United States. Some of the major rights under the FCRA include you being told when information in your current file is used against you, what data is held in your file, request your credit score, dispute inaccurate or incomplete data, and the reporting agency must correct or delete the data that is not accurate or complete.

The Fact Act stands for the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (FACTA). Under this act, several new provisions were set forth that amended the consumer rights law found in the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970 (FCRA). These amendments are a viable way to help reduce the risk of identity theft and fraud and acts as a way to help regulate all consumer financial information such as their social security numbers and other personal information.
Your credit report includes instructions on how to dispute inaccurate information. In most cases, you have to provide your credit bureau with a written statement regarding the information you are disputing. The credit bureau will then open an investigation with the creditor listed on your report. When the investigation is complete, the credit bureau is required to provide you with a written report of the outcome, as well as an updated copy of your credit report. If the dispute is ruled in your favor, the creditor must provide adjusted information to all three credit bureaus. In cases of identity theft, you should also file a police report.
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Credit reporting companies must investigate the items in question — usually within 30 days — unless they consider your dispute frivolous. They also must forward all the relevant data you provide about the inaccuracy to the organization that provided the information. After the information provider receives notice of a dispute from the credit reporting company, it must investigate, review the relevant information, and report the results back to the credit reporting company. If the information provider finds the disputed information is inaccurate, it must notify all three nationwide credit reporting companies so they can correct the information in your file.

New credit scores have been developed in the last decade by companies such as Scorelogix, PRBC, L2C, Innovis etc. which do not use bureau data to predict creditworthiness. Scorelogix's JSS Credit Score uses a different set of risk factors, such as the borrower's job stability, income, income sufficiency, and impact of economy, in predicting credit risk, and the use of such alternative credit scores is on the rise. These new types of credit scores are often combined with FICO or bureau scores to improve the accuracy of predictions. Most lenders today use some combination of bureau scores and alternative credit scores to develop better understanding of a borrower's ability to pay. It is widely recognized that FICO is a measure of past ability to pay. New credit scores that focus more on future ability to pay are being deployed to enhance credit risk models. L2C offers an alternative credit score that uses utility payment histories to determine creditworthiness, and many lenders use this score in addition to bureau scores to make lending decisions. Many lenders use Scorelogix's JSS score in addition to bureau scores, given that the JSS score incorporates job and income stability to determine whether the borrower will have the ability to repay debt in the future. It is thought that the FICO score will remain the dominant score, but it will likely be used in conjunction with other alternative credit scores that offer other pictures of risk.

If you are applying for a mortgage to buy a new home or you want to lease a new car, the lender who is providing you the loan will then pull your credit report in order to determine if you are eligible for a loan, also known as your creditworthiness. Other times a credit report will be pulled is when you are planning on renting an apartment or if you just want to browse your current credit standing yourself.


help guard against identity theft. That’s when someone uses your personal information — like your name, your Social Security number, or your credit card number — to commit fraud. Identity thieves may use your information to open a new credit card account in your name. Then, when they don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report. Inaccurate information like that could affect your ability to get credit, insurance, or even a job.
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