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How does information get on my credit report and is it updated on a regular basis?Every month, lenders submit updates on your credit profile to at least one of the three credit reporting companies—TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. Since lenders do not necessarily report to all three companies, the information on your credit reports may vary. It is also true that lenders report at different times of the month, a factor that might contribute to slight differences in your reports, and therefore your credit scores, at any given time.
Are you in need of a loan, but your credit is bad? That's not an issue at all! Rely on our team to validate bad credit that keeps you from getting the money you need. Whether they are inaccurate student loans or inaccurate tax liens, our credit specialists will remove your bad credit quickly. Trust us to get personalized solutions for all your credit problems.
"I'm sure you hear this all the time but I couldn't stop singing songs of praise to the staff at the Lexington Law Firm. I got an updated copy of my Experian Credit Report today and I was so happy I started jumping up and down in the driveway. They deleted six out of nine negative entries — and in less than two months — now that's what I call SERVICE. I can't wait to see the negative entries fall off my other reports as well! Thanks a million!"

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Joint accounts are meant to help individuals who cannot qualify for a loan by themselves. With joint accounts, all of the joint account holders, guarantors, and/or cosigners are responsible for repaying the debt. The joint account, along with its credit history, appears on the credit report for all account holders. When all payments are made on time, the joint account can help build positive credit. However, if someone defaults on payments, all of the joint account holders will see the default on their own credit reports. Depending on the severity of the late payments and negative information, everyone's credit scores could be impacted significantly.
All those credit cards from college that initially hurt Chua, for example, helped him down the line. That’s because he never cut them up, creating a longer credit history and a higher average age across his accounts. Both of those numbers feed into the 15 percent or so of a FICO score based on the length of your credit history. A virtuous cycle develops when you have good credit, says Chua. More companies offer you credit, which raises your total credit limit, which means you can make bigger transactions but still use the same percentage of your total credit.
You also have the right to challenge a derogatory mark that isn't 100 percent accurate, says Warren, such as a creditor reporting you were 90 days late paying a bill when you were only 60 days late. If a bill that went to collections was sold to another debt collector and your credit report incorrectly shows the same overdue balance multiple times, you can request the credit bureau correct it.
Your credit report is a compilation of information about the way you handle your credit and debt accounts. It includes information about how much debt you've accumulated, how you pay your bills, where you live, where you work, whether you've filed bankruptcy or had a lawsuit judgment entered againt you, and whether you've had a home foreclosed or vehicle repossessed. If it sounds like your credit report contains a lot of information, that's because it does. An antual credit report can be over 100 pages long.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months. The FCRA promotes the accuracy and privacy of information in the files of the nation’s credit reporting companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the FCRA with respect to credit reporting companies.
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