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Just want to read your credit report without seeing your score? You can do that once a year, completely free, at www.annualcreditreport.com. The nice thing about this government-sanctioned site is that you can request reports from all three bureaus: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Because some banks use only one or two of the reports to make lending decisions, it’s always a good idea to make sure all three contain accurate information about your borrowing history.

In order to obtain your credit report, you must provide your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth. If you've moved within the last two years, you should include your previous address. To protect the security of your personal information, you may be asked a series of questions that only you would know, like your monthly mortgage payment.
Your 3 credit reports will be pulled when a lender needs to determine if you are eligible to get a loan or get approved for a new credit card that you are applying for from an issuer. Your credit report which comes from one of the major bureau or all 3 major bureaus depending on the provider you choose to go with. For example, with the VantageScore 3.0 you will have the benefit of getting all 3 of your credit reports displayed.
Lenders use these reports to help them decide if they will loan you money, what interest rates they will offer you. Lenders also use your credit report to determine whether you continue to meet the terms of an existing credit account. Other businesses might use your credit reports to determine whether to offer you insurance; rent a house or apartment to you; provide you with cable TV, internet, utility, or cell phone service. If you agree to let an employer look at your credit report, it may also be used to make employment decisions about you.
Lenders, such as banks and credit card companies, use credit scores to evaluate the potential risk posed by lending money to consumers and to mitigate losses due to bad debt. Lenders use credit scores to determine who qualifies for a loan, at what interest rate, and what credit limits. Lenders also use credit scores to determine which customers are likely to bring in the most revenue. The use of credit or identity scoring prior to authorizing access or granting credit is an implementation of a trusted system.
Your credit report will not be the same across all of the three major bureaus (Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax) because not all lenders report to all three. Some might have inputted the data wrong and might show up with errors while others might be perfectly correct. That is why it is important to check your report from all three of the major bureaus at least once a year (which is free) to determine if there are any issues. You cannot make any lender report your credit, so it is important to know the differences between your reports since different lenders pull your report usually from different bureaus.
At Bankrate, we believe your score plays a key role in understanding your overall financial situation. Not only does it help you make sense of your report, it provides a deeper insight into what creditors and lenders look for when determining whether you qualify for a credit card or loan. That’s why it’s important to check your credit report at least annually. Keeping tabs on it regularly is better, though, because spotting mistakes and irregularities can prevent fraud, identity theft and other credit nightmares.
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Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.
Along with your credit scores, you’ll get an updated credit report card every 14 days, that shows you the factors impacting your credit score. You also find out how your credit score stacks up against others in your state and across the U.S., then chart how your score changes over time. You get five easy-to-understand grades along with your credit scores, plus highlights of the most important items for you to watch, such as negative information and debt utilization.
A: Under federal law, you’re entitled to a free report if a company takes adverse action against you, such as denying your application for credit, insurance, or employment, and you ask for your report within 60 days of receiving notice of the action. The notice will give you the name, address, and phone number of the credit reporting company. You’re also entitled to one free report a year if you’re unemployed and plan to look for a job within 60 days; if you’re on welfare; or if your report is inaccurate because of fraud, including identity theft. Otherwise, a credit reporting company may charge you a reasonable amount for another copy of your report within a 12-month period.
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