free-credit-report

There are several sections to the report that cover both the good and bad, if needed, of your credit history. At the top of the report, you'll see personal information such as your name, addresses from the last couple of decades or more, telephone numbers, and current and former employers. That's followed by public records that might show a bankruptcy, court judgment or lien.
Want to understand how to get approved for a mortgage or auto loan? Or how you can qualify for a credit card and get a lower interest rate? Do you have good payment history already but want to know what else you can do to raise your score? Our credit experts can help. We also offer you personalized product matches based off your credit scores, and give you lots of different options to choose from, so you’re in control!
A big reason for this is that American consumer finances are generally in good shape. While the overall level of household debt has returned to its pre-recession peak, it remains low when compared with income, says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. Debt service—principal and interest payments as a percent of income—is at an all-time low, helped by mortgage refinancing over the past decade.
If you find yourself sitting at an excellent credit score range then you are on the range of 750 or above according to the FICO range or an A if you are measuring based on the VantageScore 3.0 range. Getting to this position in the credit scale means that your payment history, credit utilization, credit age, credit mix, and inquiries are at the perfect (or excellent) amount. Having excellent credit opens numerous doors to the top credit card offers, best rates of loans, and other offers offered by lenders. This doesn’t mean that you are ‘done’ building your credit, especially if you are on the low end of excellent. It is recommended to continuously improve your credit.

No, credit reports list your credit history without interpretation. Credit scores, on the other hand, apply a formula to the data in your report to create a three-digit number predicting how likely you are to repay money as agreed. Two companies dominate credit scoring in the U.S.: FICO® and VantageScore®. NerdWallet partners with TransUnion® to provide your VantageScore® 3.0, based on information in your TransUnion® credit report. Credit score is only one factor lenders consider and they may not use the TransUnion VantageScore.
You should also consider your level of comfort with sharing your financial account information. The UltraFICO is a positive use of such data, Wu said, but other potential applications could be worrying, such as debt collectors accessing this data. And last year’s Equifax data breach proves that consumers should be concerned with how credit reporting agencies collect, store and use personal data.
Even if you feel that you have good credit and are in a good position financially, you should still obtain your individual credit file annually, so you can comb through it and catch any potential problems that the reporting agencies may not have caught regarding identity theft or fraud. Looking for signs of identity theft is just as important as your actual credit report and scores.
Although not every landlord does so, rent can play a role in improving your credit score in some cases. Making sure that you are paying your rent on time every month is just as important as paying any other bill or debt. Not doing so can make it end up as a late payment and impact your credit score negatively. Ask your landlord if they submit to any of the three major bureaus.
The VantageScore was developed by the three credit reporting companies -- Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion -- whereas FICO scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation, hence the term FICO. They are two different scoring models, but both FICO and VantageScore issue scores ranging from 300 to 850. A difference between the two is the fact that FICO requires at least six months of credit history and at least one account reported within the last six months in order to be able to establish your credit score, whereas VantageScore only requires one month of history and one account reported within the past two years. You can read on about the further differences between the two here: https://wallethub.com/edu/vantage-score-vs-fico-score/36859/. Furthermore, you can see where your credit stands according to the VantageScore 3.0 model by signing up for a free WalletHub account. To begin, go here: https://wallethub.com/free-credit-score/.

You can check your TransUnion credit score for free right here on WalletHub, where your score is updated on a daily basis. Checking your credit score as put forward by one credit bureau should be enough. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found a 90% correlation among a selection of the most common credit-score models. So, it doesn’t really matter which one you check, as long as it’s free and from a reputable source. Remember that you're entitled by law to your three credit scores for free each year at annualcreditreport.com


FICO, myFICO, Score Watch, The score lenders use, and The Score That Matters are trademarks or registered trademarks of Fair Isaac Corporation. Equifax Credit Report is a trademark of Equifax, Inc. and its affiliated companies. Many factors affect your FICO Score and the interest rates you may receive. Fair Isaac is not a credit repair organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. Fair Isaac does not provide "credit repair" services or advice or assistance regarding "rebuilding" or "improving" your credit record, credit history or credit rating. FTC's website on credit.
The actual number of points that an inquiry is worth is a closely guarded secret. However, it’s safe to say that only those who are “excessively” shopping for credit will be seriously damaging their scores. The moral of this story is to shop and apply for credit only when you need it and, optimally, only after you have gotten your credit and scores in good order.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months. The FCRA promotes the accuracy and privacy of information in the files of the nation’s credit reporting companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the FCRA with respect to credit reporting companies.
×