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I was added to my mother’s credit card accounts as a secondary card holder. My mother died with large outstanding balances. My credit has always been very good, but , since my mother’s death, my credit report card shows an F for payment history, but, A an A+ for everything else. I always understood that only the primary cardholder ‘s credit score was affected by unpaid balances, and not the secondary person on the account. How can I correct this negative impact on my credit score?


When a consumer applies for credit - whether for a credit card, an auto loan, or a mortgage - lenders want to know what risk they'd take by loaning money. When lenders order a credit report, they can also buy a credit score that's based on the information in the report. A credit score helps lenders evaluate a credit report because it is a number that summarizes credit risk, based on a snapshot of a credit report at a particular point in time.
You can get one free credit report each year from each of the three nationwide credit bureaus. The website annualcreditreport.com is your portal to your free reports. (Note: when you leave that website and move to the company website to get your free report, the company will probably try to get you to sign up for costly and unnecessary credit monitoring services.)

Developing your credit score comes naturally as a result of building your credit history. You’ve heard the saying “if you build it they will come?” It applies to credit scoring as well. If you build your credit history then your score will come shortly after followed by more creditors that will want your business. The credit scoring models are looking for two things before they will “score” your credit files: age and activity. For some credit score models, you must have at least one account that is greater than 3 to 6 months old and at least one account that has been reported to the credit bureaus within the last 6 to 12 months. The same account can qualify you for a score. So, a credit report with one account open for 9 months that has reported to the credit bureaus within the past 30 days will qualify for a score. Once you’ve built a score, the challenge is to maximize it.


Having good credit means that you have built a solid credit history by working hard to keep your accounts in good standing – however, there may be a late payment or two somewhere in your past. Things happen sometimes, but they are nothing you can’t handle. You might have had a collections account reported, but you’ve paid it. And you know you have some extra credit card debt, but you’ve made strides to get it under control.


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However, there is a big myth that you have to borrow money and pay interest to get a good score. That is completely false! So long as you use your credit card (it can even be a small $1 charge) and then pay that statement balance in full, your score will benefit. You do not need to pay interest on a credit card to improve your score. Remember: your goal is to have as much positive information as possible, with very little negative information. That means you should be as focused on adding positive information to your credit report as you are at avoiding negative information.
You can also request your free credit report by phone or by mail. The three reporting bureaus get their information from different places, and also present and evaluate the information in different ways. If you are making a large purchase, such as a car or home, it is a good idea to get your credit report from all three agencies. Save and print your reports so that you can review them later.
Listen, it happens to everyone. Adulting is hard and sometimes, life gets in the way of life. With so many responsibilities to juggle, it’s not unusual or shameful when something falls off your priority list. If you do miss a payment, don’t panic. Consider calling the credit card company or lender to ask them to remove the fee –– especially if you’ve never missed a payment before. Then, pay the balance as soon as possible.
While multiple hard inquiries can increase score drops, particularly for those who are new to credit, credit-scoring agencies recognize the importance of rate shopping. As a result, multiple inquiries for student loans that occur with a 14- to 45-day window (depending on the type of credit score) only count as a single inquiry when your score is being calculated.
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If a derogatory mark is added to your credit report, it’s important to get assistance as soon as possible. A credit repair professional can help you filter through the overwhelming information and requirements to find a solution that works best for your unique situation. If you do see a derogatory mark on your credit score that you don’t recognize, follow up.
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Collection Accounts – These accounts may be reported for seven years plus 180 days from the date you first fell behind with the original creditor, leading up to when the account was charged off and placed for collection. After that time period elapses, they may no longer be reported, even if they remain unpaid or have been sold to a new collection agency.
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If you’re the parent of a teenager, you might wonder if now is the right time to help them open a credit card. It can be hard to decide if they’re ready to take on the responsibility that comes with having a credit card since you need to trust that your teen has the restraint to limit spending and pay on time. Generally, we recommend introducing your teen to credit as soon as you can since credit is such a large part of life as an adult — you need credit to take out loans, apply for a mortgage and even make certain purchases. Plus, it’s important for your teenager to learn how to manage credit responsibly so they can build good credit.

Credit Bureaus Make Mistakes: Roughly one in four of us has a mistake on one of our major credit reports that is significant enough to result in rejection by a lender, landlord, insurer, employer or other type of creditor, according to a study by the Federal Trade Commission. And if you do manage to get approved for a loan or line of credit despite this disadvantage, you’ll wind up needlessly wasting money on a worse offer than you truly deserve.In other words, taking a few minutes to make sure your credit report is accurate – especially if your credit score isn’t excellent – is an investment that could save you big in terms of both time and money in the long run.
When you are doing a credit check yourself pulling your annual free credit report you are performing a soft credit inquiry. This type of action does not impact your credit at all. On the other hand if you are applying for a loan, a credit card, or a mortgage, that will be counted as a hard credit inquiry and will slightly decrease your credit score.
AnnualCreditReport.com is the Only Authorized Source for Free Annual Credit Reports under federal law. Other sites often require users to pay hidden fees or agree to additional services. For example, some sites provide a free credit report if you enroll in a new service. If you don't cancel the service during a short trial period, you're likely to see membership fees on your credit card statement. Learn more by clicking here. Watch the videos:
It’s been only a year since I opened my first card last September, and I already have a solid FICO score – 720, the last time I checked.  That’s not a perfect score by any means, but it lands me safely in the “good” credit range, meaning I probably won’t have trouble getting approved for new credit in the future. I still have work to do if I want to get into the “very good” credit category, which starts at 740, according to MyFICO, but for a credit card newbie I’m not disappointed in my progress so far. 

When you sign up for your free Credit.com account, you get your credit report card that tells you how you’re doing in the major areas of your credit score. Your Vantage score, like your FICO score, is a joint venture of the big three credit bureaus—Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. The Vantage and FICO scoring models are the scores that most lenders use to evaluate you when you apply for a new credit card, a mortgage, and other types of accounts.
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