free-credit-report

Be patient – After reviewing your reason codes you may realize that a plan to rebuild your scores may take longer than you’d like. A low score caused by delinquencies will take time to rebuild because delinquencies stay on your credit files for years. However, as these delinquencies age, their impact on your scores will lessen and your scores will increase as long as you now manage your credit well and pay accounts on time.
In order to obtain your credit report, you must provide your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth. If you've moved within the last two years, you should include your previous address. To protect the security of your personal information, you may be asked a series of questions that only you would know, like your monthly mortgage payment.
Law enforcement; emergencies; compliance; other purposes permitted by law. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Policy to the contrary, we reserve the right to disclose personal information to others as we believe appropriate (a) to comply with legal process; (b) to respond to governmental requests; (c) to enforce our Terms and Conditions; (d) to protect the rights, privacy, safety or property of ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., our affiliated companies, you or others; (e) to permit us to pursue available remedies or limit the damages that we may sustain; and (f) for any other purpose permitted by applicable law.

You'll see how you're doing, where you stand compared to the national Average and how you got there. A lot of information goes into making your FICO® Credit Score. So, we give you 5 key aspects of credit that drive your score, including number of open accounts, how long you've had credit, number of recent inquiries, revolving credit usage and number of missed payments.


The amount of credit you owe also affects your credit score in a big way. If your credit-to- debt ratio (how much you owe compared to your available credit) is low, your credit score will benefit, since it illustrates that you don’t rely too much on credit. You can figure out your utilization rate by dividing your total credit balances by your total credit limits.
Credit Reports Can Reveal Fraud: Financial fraud can take many forms, most of which will manifest on your credit report before anywhere else. The warning sign could be something as overt as an unknown account being opened in your name, a bankruptcy filing showing up in your public records or a collections account appearing unexpectedly. Or it could be something as simple as a change to your listed name and address. Regardless, you might not notice if you’re not plugged in to your credit report.“Many people think, ‘Well, I’m not about to apply for credit; I’m not about to get a loan; I don’t need to get my credit report,’” said Gail Cunningham, vice president of membership and public relations with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. “Yes, you do because you could be a victim of identity theft.”That’s why you should review your reports at least once a year, and make sure that your free-credit-report provider offers free 24/7 credit monitoring, too (like WalletHub!). This will give you day-to-day peace of mind. And that figures to be worthwhile regardless of your current financial situation or plans for the future.
FICO® Scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation. The FICO Score provided by ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., also referred to as Experian Consumer Services ("ECS"), in Experian CreditWorksSM, Credit TrackerSM and/or your free Experian membership (as applicable) is based on FICO Score 8, unless otherwise noted. Many but not all lenders use FICO Score 8. In addition to the FICO Score 8, ECS may offer and provide other base or industry-specific FICO Scores (such as FICO Auto Scores and FICO Bankcard Scores). The other FICO Scores made available are calculated from versions of the base and industry-specific FICO Score models. There are many different credit scoring models that can give a different assessment of your credit rating and relative risk (risk of default) for the same credit report. Your lender or insurer may use a different FICO Score than FICO Score 8 or such other base or industry-specific FICO Score, or another type of credit score altogether. Just remember that your credit rating is often the same even if the number is not. For some consumers, however, the credit rating of FICO Score 8 (or other FICO Score) could vary from the score used by your lender. The statements that "90% of top lenders use FICO Scores" and "FICO Scores are used in 90% of credit decisions" are based on a third-party study of all versions of FICO Scores sold to lenders, including but not limited to scores based on FICO Score 8. Base FICO Scores (including the FICO Score 8) range from 300 to 850. Industry-specific FICO Scores range from 250-900. Higher scores represent a greater likelihood that you'll pay back your debts so you are viewed as being a lower credit risk to lenders. A lower FICO Score indicates to lenders that you may be a higher credit risk. There are three different major credit reporting agencies — the Experian credit bureau, TransUnion® and Equifax® — that maintain a record of your credit history known as your credit report. Your FICO Score is based on the information in your credit report at the time it is requested. Your credit report information can vary from agency to agency because some lenders report your credit history to only one or two of the agencies. So your FICO Score can vary if the information they have on file for you is different. Since the information in your report can change over time, your FICO Score may also change.
Understanding your credit score and how it is calculated helps you take control of your credit and may lead to lower interest rates and more money-saving opportunities. Your credit report is one of the most important documents in your life. Whether you’re taking out a mortgage, a car loan or applying for a credit card, your credit report has a huge influence on the offers that lenders will approve you for.
Annualcreditreport.com and the nationwide credit reporting companies will not send you an email asking for your personal information. If you get an email, see a pop-up ad, or get a phone call from someone claiming to be from annualcreditreport.com or any of the three nationwide credit reporting companies, do not reply or click on any link in the message. It’s probably a scam. Forward any such email to the FTC at spam@uce.gov.
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