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Although there is no set amount of time required to attain a good credit score, having an aged credit account does make a significant impact on your credit score value. The account age category is responsible for 15% of your credit calculation. This section of your score is responsible for giving an idea of how responsible you are with your credit since you started.

If your credit score is between 750 and 800, you have a long and distinguished credit history that shows a responsible payment history and the ability to handle multiple types of credit responsibly. As a matter of fact, for the most part, you are regarded in the same standard as borrowers with excellent credit history, with the exception that you may have a higher debt-to-income ratio.
This is as bad as it gets, as this will have many negative effects on your life. Lenders, with the exception of those who specialize in lending to borrowers with bad credit, will not approve you for any loan product, even if you can provide a sizable down payment or collateral, and insurance agencies will likely refuse you based on the risks you pose. Often, employers that check your credit will not hire you, whether there is another viable candidate or not.
In today’s banking environment, the decision to offer you a mortgage or grant you a credit card sometimes comes down to one simple thing: your credit score. Based on information in your credit report (no, they are not the same thing), this numerical rating provides an easy way to assess your risk of defaulting on a loan. No wonder, then, that consumers are eager to find out their score – and if possible, for free.
Your credit score and credit report are separate from one another. Your report is your entire credit history of all your installment (loan) and revolving (credit card) accounts. Your credit score on the other hand, is a number calculated from your credit history that shows where you stand in terms of credit health. Even though the two are related, you do have to request them separately.
When the investigation is complete, the credit reporting company must give you the written results and a free copy of your report if the dispute results in a change. (This free report does not count as your annual free report.) If an item is changed or deleted, the credit reporting company cannot put the disputed information back in your file unless the information provider verifies that it is accurate and complete. The credit reporting company also must send you written notice that includes the name, address, and phone number of the information provider.

You can get one free credit report each year from each of the three nationwide credit bureaus. The website annualcreditreport.com is your portal to your free reports. (Note: when you leave that website and move to the company website to get your free report, the company will probably try to get you to sign up for costly and unnecessary credit monitoring services.)
Along with your credit scores, you’ll get an updated credit report card every 14 days, that shows you the factors impacting your credit score. You also find out how your credit score stacks up against others in your state and across the U.S., then chart how your score changes over time. You get five easy-to-understand grades along with your credit scores, plus highlights of the most important items for you to watch, such as negative information and debt utilization.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months. The FCRA promotes the accuracy and privacy of information in the files of the nation’s credit reporting companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the FCRA with respect to credit reporting companies.
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