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Assignment. We reserve the right to transfer any and all information that we collect from Site users to an affiliate or a third party in the event of any reorganization, merger, sale, joint venture, assignment, transfer or other disposition of all or any portion of our business, assets or stock (including without limitation in connection with any bankruptcy or similar proceedings).

For a FICO® Score to be calculated, your credit report from the bureau for which the score is being calculated must contain enough information - and enough recent information - on which to base a credit score. Generally, that means you must have at least one account that has been open for six months or longer, and at least one account that has been reported to the credit bureau within the last six months.
SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT COLLECTIONS: Collection agencies will often report debts to the credit bureaus in an attempt to collect from the consumer. This is perfectly legal as defined by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. The issue here is that, intentionally or not, collection agencies sometimes report to the credit bureaus using a newer “purge from” date despite the fact that this is not allowed under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The result of this misreporting is that the collection item will remain on the credit file longer than they should. If that happens, you can dispute the old account.
The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is responsible for encouraging the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of all data that is held by the credit reporting bureaus in the United States. Some of the major rights under the FCRA include you being told when information in your current file is used against you, what data is held in your file, request your credit score, dispute inaccurate or incomplete data, and the reporting agency must correct or delete the data that is not accurate or complete.

Carrying a balance on your credit cards because you can’t afford to pay off the entire amount is understandable. Carrying a balance in hopes that it will improve your credit score is a huge mistake and one of the biggest credit myths out there. You don’t need to carry a balance to build credit – the balance reported to the credit bureaus is from your last statement, not what is carried over to the next statement.
Information That You Voluntarily Provide. We also collect non-personal information (e.g., your geographic location, etc.) when you voluntarily provide such information to us. When such information is not combined with any personal information, such information is considered to be non-personal information, as it does not personally identify you or any other user. Additionally, we may aggregate personal information in a manner such that the end-product does not personally identify you or any other user of the Site, for example, by using personal information to calculate the percentage of our users who have a particular telephone area code. Such aggregate information is considered non-personal information for purposes of this Policy.
Promotions. We may operate sweepstakes, contests and similar promotions (collectively, "Promotions") through the Site. We typically ask you for certain personal information when you enter and, if applicable, win a Promotion. You should carefully review the rules, if any, of each Promotion in which you participate through the Site, as they may contain additional important information about our use of personal information. To the extent that the terms and conditions of such rules concerning the treatment of personal information conflict with this Policy, the terms and conditions of such rules will control.
What is a credit score, and what is the difference among the three credit reporting agency (CRA) credit scores? A credit score is a three digit number, typically between 300 and 850, which is designed to represent your credit risk, or the likelihood you will pay your bills on time. A credit score is calculated based on a method using the content of your consumer file.
help guard against identity theft. That’s when someone uses your personal information — like your name, your Social Security number, or your credit card number — to commit fraud. Identity thieves may use your information to open a new credit card account in your name. Then, when they don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report. Inaccurate information like that could affect your ability to get credit, insurance, or even a job.
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