free-credit-report

Payment history is the largest component of your credit score. Making your credit card or loan payments on time is crucial in establishing your credit and maintaining a good score in the future. Payments that are more than 30 days late will start to hurt your score. At the very least, be sure to pay your bills no later than 30 days after the due date.

Cookies. Subject to the section above pertaining to cookies and similar technologies, you have the ability to prohibit being served an advertisement based on cookie technology. We utilize reputable third-party vendors to serve advertisements. If however, you are not comfortable with cookies, you can adjust the settings within your browser to further prohibit being served a cookie. Please see the browser's instructions to perform this task. Additionally, the Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) has developed an opt-out tool with the express purpose of allowing consumers to "opt-out" of the targeted advertising delivered by participating companies. We may share anonymous or de-identified information with such companies for the purposes of delivering targeted advertising; however you may visit the DAA opt-out page and opt-out of this cookie tracking if you do not wish to receive targeted advertising. Please visit: http://www.aboutads.info/choices/ for more information.
A financial institution such as a credit union, which typically issues credit builder loans, deposits a small amount of money into a secured savings account for the applicant. The borrower then pays the money back in small monthly installments — with interest — over a set period of time. At the end of the loan’s term, which typically ranges from six to 24 months, the borrower receives the total amount of the credit builder loan in a lump sum, plus any interest earned if the lender offers interest.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months. The FCRA promotes the accuracy and privacy of information in the files of the nation’s credit reporting companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the FCRA with respect to credit reporting companies.
×