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Some 200 million U.S. consumers have FICO credit scores, while just under 3 million, or about 1.4 percent, have perfect 850s. That’s according to Fair Isaac Corp., the company behind the 28-year-old scoring model used by lenders to predict whether you will pay back a loan. But over the years the number has become much more than that—it’s now an American totem of success or failure, hope or despair, security or risk. While there are competing models, almost anyone with a credit card knows that a number typically ranging between 300 and 850 holds huge sway over their financial life.
A: It’s up to you. Because nationwide credit reporting companies get their information from different sources, the information in your report from one company may not reflect all, or the same, information in your reports from the other two companies. That’s not to say that the information in any of your reports is necessarily inaccurate; it just may be different.
Because MidSouth Community is a federal credit union, you need to be a member to qualify for this card. Membership is limited to people who work, live, worship, or attend school in the following Middle Georgia counties: Bibb, Baldwin, Crawford, Hancock, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs, Washington, and Wilkinson. If you qualify, you may be able to get a secured card with an APR as low as 10.90% Variable.
At Bankrate, we believe your score plays a key role in understanding your overall financial situation. Not only does it help you make sense of your report, it provides a deeper insight into what creditors and lenders look for when determining whether you qualify for a credit card or loan. That’s why it’s important to check your credit report at least annually. Keeping tabs on it regularly is better, though, because spotting mistakes and irregularities can prevent fraud, identity theft and other credit nightmares.

FICO® Scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation. The FICO® Score provided by ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., also referred to as Experian Consumer Services ("ECS"), in Experian CreditWorksSM, Credit TrackerSM and/or your free Experian membership (as applicable) is based on FICO® Score 8, unless otherwise noted. Many but not all lenders use FICO® Score 8. In addition to the FICO® Score 8, ECS may offer and provide other base or industry-specific FICO® Scores (such as FICO® Auto Scores and FICO® Bankcard Scores). The other FICO® Scores made available are calculated from versions of the base and industry-specific FICO® Score models. There are many different credit scoring models that can give a different assessment of your credit rating and relative risk (risk of default) for the same credit report. Your lender or insurer may use a different FICO® Score than FICO® Score 8 or such other base or industry-specific FICO® Score, or another type of credit score altogether. Just remember that your credit rating is often the same even if the number is not. For some consumers, however, the credit rating of FICO® Score 8 (or other FICO® Score) could vary from the score used by your lender. The statements that "90% of top lenders use FICO® Scores" and "FICO® Scores are used in 90% of credit decisions" are based on a third-party study of all versions of FICO® Scores sold to lenders, including but not limited to scores based on FICO® Score 8. Base FICO® Scores (including the FICO® Score 8) range from 300 to 850. Industry-specific FICO® Scores range from 250-900. Higher scores represent a greater likelihood that you'll pay back your debts so you are viewed as being a lower credit risk to lenders. A lower FICO® Score indicates to lenders that you may be a higher credit risk. There are three different major credit reporting agencies — the Experian credit bureau, TransUnion® and Equifax® — that maintain a record of your credit history known as your credit report. Your FICO® Score is based on the information in your credit report at the time it is requested. Your credit report information can vary from agency to agency because some lenders report your credit history to only one or two of the agencies. So your FICO® Score can vary if the information they have on file for you is different. Since the information in your report can change over time, your FICO® Score may also change.
With a low score, you may still be able to get credit, but it will come with higher interest rates or with specific conditions, such as depositing money to get a secured credit card. You also may have to pay more for car insurance or put down deposits on utilities. Landlords might use your score to decide whether they want you as a tenant. But as you add points to your score, you'll have access to more credit products — and pay less to use them. And borrowers with scores above 750 or so have many options, including the ability to qualify for 0% financing on cars and 0% interest credit cards.
Hi Jenny, Doing a soft credit check, such as just pulling your credit score with Credit Sesame, does not impact your credit score. On the other hand, if you are doing a hard credit inquiry, such as applying for a loan, that can slightly reduce your score. Renting an apartment for some credit bureaus would have an effect on your score, while others would not considerate it.
Be punished for missed payments: Not all late payments are created equally. If you are fewer than 30 days late, your missed payment will likely not be reported to the bureau (although you still will be subject to late fees and potential risk-based re-pricing, which can be very expensive). Once you are 30 days late, you will be reported to the credit bureau. The longer you go without paying, the bigger the impact on your score, ie: 60 days late is worse than 30 days late. A single missed payment (of 30 days or more) can still have a big impact on your score. It can take anywhere from 60 to 110 points off your score.
In the eyes of lenders, employers, insurance agents, and a host of other people and entities, the state of your credit represents how responsible and even how ethical you are. For example, lenders look at your credit score to determine not only your ability, but your willingness to repay a loan. Insurance companies view an individual with a good credit score as someone who is trustworthy and less likely to commit insurance fraud. Even many employers run a credit check to determine if a candidate is likely to be a responsible employee. (However, it should be noted that employers only have access to a modified version of your credit report which omits some personal information including your account numbers and year of birth.)
In the eyes of lenders, employers, insurance agents, and a host of other people and entities, the state of your credit represents how responsible and even how ethical you are. For example, lenders look at your credit score to determine not only your ability, but your willingness to repay a loan. Insurance companies view an individual with a good credit score as someone who is trustworthy and less likely to commit insurance fraud. Even many employers run a credit check to determine if a candidate is likely to be a responsible employee. (However, it should be noted that employers only have access to a modified version of your credit report which omits some personal information including your account numbers and year of birth.)
Especially if you’ve had good enough credit to open an elite credit card with an excellent rewards program, it makes sense that some of your very first credit accounts are collecting dust. It might seem financially responsible to clean house financially and close some of your older or neglected credit accounts, but consider this: your oldest accounts are also your greatest and longest source of credit history. If you close them, the pool of information that dictates your credit score will shrink, making you more vulnerable to credit report dings.

Only one website is authorized to fill orders for the free annual credit report you are entitled to under law — annualcreditreport.com. Other websites that claim to offer “free credit reports,” “free credit scores,” or “free credit monitoring” are not part of the legally mandated free annual credit report program. In some cases, the “free” product comes with strings attached. For example, some sites sign you up for a supposedly “free” service that converts to one you have to pay for after a trial period. If you don’t cancel during the trial period, you may be unwittingly agreeing to let the company start charging fees to your credit card.
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