free-credit-report

Credit reporting companies must investigate the items in question — usually within 30 days — unless they consider your dispute frivolous. They also must forward all the relevant data you provide about the inaccuracy to the organization that provided the information. After the information provider receives notice of a dispute from the credit reporting company, it must investigate, review the relevant information, and report the results back to the credit reporting company. If the information provider finds the disputed information is inaccurate, it must notify all three nationwide credit reporting companies so they can correct the information in your file.
A: If you request your report online at annualcreditreport.com, you should be able to access it immediately. If you order your report by calling toll-free 1-877-322-8228, your report will be processed and mailed to you within 15 days. If you order your report by mail using the Annual Credit Report Request Form, your request will be processed and mailed to you within 15 days of receipt.
Income does not play a role when it comes to determining your credit score because the credit bureaus that collect data do not collect anything regarding your income. What does matter is how you manage your loans and other activities that play a role on your credit score – which are weighted individually based on importance towards your overall score.
Too many “hard” checks of your credit can ding your score. For example, if you apply for several credit cards at once, several credit inquiries will appear on your report. Too many credit checks (as well as applying for/opening too many accounts) can give the impression that you’re a credit risk. Apply for new credit accounts sparingly, to limit the amount of credit checks you may incur.

AnnualCreditReport.com is a website jointly operated by the three major U.S. credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. The site was created in order to comply with their obligations under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA)[1] to provide a mechanism for American consumers to receive up to three free credit reports per year.


A credit report includes information on where you live, how you pay your bills, and whether you’ve been sued or have filed for bankruptcy. Nationwide credit reporting companies sell the information in your report to creditors, insurers, employers, and other businesses that use it to evaluate your applications for credit, insurance, employment, or renting a home.
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