free-credit-report

An account that’s in collections can severely damage a credit score, since its reached the point that a borrower has given up paying their bills – and now, their lender has asked a collection agency to intervene and get the debt paid. A bankruptcy never has a positive impact on your credit score, but the severity which it affects your numbers depends on your own individual credit profile and situation.
When you apply for insurance, the insurer may ask for permission to review your medical history report.., An insurance company can only access your report if you give them permission. The report contains the information you included in past insurance applications. Insurers read these reports before they'll approve life, health, long-term, critical illness, or disability insurance applications.
Several years ago, it was common for companies to advertise “free credit reports” on TV and radio spots. Most of the offers were a bait and switch. Sign up, get a free credit report and score, then see your credit card charged $10-$20 every month after that if you didn’t cancel on time. Thankfully, the Credit Card Act of 2009 changed the way companies are allowed to advertise free credit reports. The Federal Trade Commission now requires credit bureaus and credit monitoring services to market credit reports differently than previously.

FICO® Scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation. The FICO® Score provided by ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., also referred to as Experian Consumer Services ("ECS"), in Experian CreditWorksSM, Credit TrackerSM and/or your free Experian membership (as applicable) is based on FICO® Score 8, unless otherwise noted. Many but not all lenders use FICO® Score 8. In addition to the FICO® Score 8, ECS may offer and provide other base or industry-specific FICO® Scores (such as FICO® Auto Scores and FICO® Bankcard Scores). The other FICO® Scores made available are calculated from versions of the base and industry-specific FICO® Score models. There are many different credit scoring models that can give a different assessment of your credit rating and relative risk (risk of default) for the same credit report. Your lender or insurer may use a different FICO® Score than FICO® Score 8 or such other base or industry-specific FICO® Score, or another type of credit score altogether. Just remember that your credit rating is often the same even if the number is not. For some consumers, however, the credit rating of FICO® Score 8 (or other FICO® Score) could vary from the score used by your lender. The statements that "90% of top lenders use FICO® Scores" and "FICO® Scores are used in 90% of credit decisions" are based on a third-party study of all versions of FICO® Scores sold to lenders, including but not limited to scores based on FICO® Score 8. Base FICO® Scores (including the FICO® Score 8) range from 300 to 850. Industry-specific FICO® Scores range from 250-900. Higher scores represent a greater likelihood that you'll pay back your debts so you are viewed as being a lower credit risk to lenders. A lower FICO® Score indicates to lenders that you may be a higher credit risk. There are three different major credit reporting agencies — the Experian credit bureau, TransUnion® and Equifax® — that maintain a record of your credit history known as your credit report. Your FICO® Score is based on the information in your credit report at the time it is requested. Your credit report information can vary from agency to agency because some lenders report your credit history to only one or two of the agencies. So your FICO® Score can vary if the information they have on file for you is different. Since the information in your report can change over time, your FICO® Score may also change.
When ordering your credit report online, be sure to spell annualcreditreport.com correctly. You will then avoid being misdirected to other websites that claim to offer free reports, but only with the purchase of other products. While the authorized website may offer you additional products, you are not required to make a purchase to receive your free credit reports.
Payment history is the largest component of your credit score. Making your credit card or loan payments on time is crucial in establishing your credit and maintaining a good score in the future. Payments that are more than 30 days late will start to hurt your score. At the very least, be sure to pay your bills no later than 30 days after the due date.
The Discover it® Secured isn’t like most secured cards — it offers a cashback program and a simple transition to an unsecured card. Starting at eight months from account opening, Discover will conduct automatic monthly account reviews to see if your security deposit can be returned while you still use your card. Unlike most secured cards that lack rewards, this card offers 2% cash back at restaurants and gas stations on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter. Plus, 1% cash back on all your other purchases. And, Discover will match ALL the cash back you’ve earned at the end of your first year, automatically. There’s no signing up. And no limit to how much is matched. This is a great added perk while you work on building credit.
Listen, it happens to everyone. Adulting is hard and sometimes, life gets in the way of life. With so many responsibilities to juggle, it’s not unusual or shameful when something falls off your priority list. If you do miss a payment, don’t panic. Consider calling the credit card company or lender to ask them to remove the fee –– especially if you’ve never missed a payment before. Then, pay the balance as soon as possible.

You can order your free credit reports online from annualcreditreport.com, the only authorized website for free credit reports. This is the only site authorized to issue free credit reports, so be aware of imitation websites that charge unnecessary fees. Be prepared to provide and verify your personal information, such as your social security number and address.


help guard against identity theft. That’s when someone uses your personal information — like your name, your Social Security number, or your credit card number — to commit fraud. Identity thieves may use your information to open a new credit card account in your name. Then, when they don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report. Inaccurate information like that could affect your ability to get credit, insurance, or even a job.
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