free-credit-report

For a FICO® Score to be calculated, your credit report from the bureau for which the score is being calculated must contain enough information - and enough recent information - on which to base a credit score. Generally, that means you must have at least one account that has been open for six months or longer, and at least one account that has been reported to the credit bureau within the last six months.
It’s important that you have access to your credit score, especially since it's not part of your free credit report. After all, it’s a number that lenders, landlords and others use to evaluate your credit worthiness. Our philosophy is that you should have access to your own information, without having to pay for it each time, or cause any negative hits to your credit. With Credit.com, you get a free credit score from Experian, the most comprehensive credit bureau in the U.S., and the best part is, checking it through Credit.com doesn’t cause any hard inquiries, so you won’t hurt your score by doing so. Plus, you get your VantageScore 3.0 credit score, which lots of lenders use! So, empower yourself!

AnnualCreditReport.com requires users to register with the site and provide their basic identification information, such as name, address, and Social Security number. The user is then sent to the website of the individual credit reporting agency they select, where they are asked additional security questions to confirm their identity before getting their report.[2] A consumer can request reports from all three agencies at the same time or stagger the requests throughout the twelve-month period as a way to self-monitor their credit data.[2] In order to obtain a free credit report, users are not required to give a credit card number but establishing an account is required by some of the agencies. Any inaccuracies or signs of identity theft may be dealt with using the mechanisms provided for under the FCRA and FACTA.
Your 3 credit reports will be pulled when a lender needs to determine if you are eligible to get a loan or get approved for a new credit card that you are applying for from an issuer. Your credit report which comes from one of the major bureau or all 3 major bureaus depending on the provider you choose to go with. For example, with the VantageScore 3.0 you will have the benefit of getting all 3 of your credit reports displayed.
In the eyes of lenders, employers, insurance agents, and a host of other people and entities, the state of your credit represents how responsible and even how ethical you are. For example, lenders look at your credit score to determine not only your ability, but your willingness to repay a loan. Insurance companies view an individual with a good credit score as someone who is trustworthy and less likely to commit insurance fraud. Even many employers run a credit check to determine if a candidate is likely to be a responsible employee. (However, it should be noted that employers only have access to a modified version of your credit report which omits some personal information including your account numbers and year of birth.)

Having fair credit means that you have some work to do in order to get yourself back into good financial shape. It is imperative to take steps now to prevent any additional damage to your credit report, and get back on the road to good financial health. By reducing credit card debt, ensuring that you get your bills paid on time every month, and paying off any open collections, your credit score will move enough during the next three to six months to get you back into the realm of a good credit rating.
A credit report includes information on where you live, how you pay your bills, and whether you’ve been sued or have filed for bankruptcy. Nationwide credit reporting companies sell the information in your report to creditors, insurers, employers, and other businesses that use it to evaluate your applications for credit, insurance, employment, or renting a home.
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