free-credit-report

When visitors sign up, they’re often enrolled, unwittingly, in a credit monitoring service that charges a monthly fee. In 2010, the Federal Trade Commission attempted to clamp down on this practice. It required “free” sites to provide a warning that, under federal law, the only authorized source for no-cost credit reports (though not free credit scores) is www.annualcreditreport.com.
Collection Accounts – These accounts may be reported for seven years plus 180 days from the date you first fell behind with the original creditor, leading up to when the account was charged off and placed for collection. After that time period elapses, they may no longer be reported, even if they remain unpaid or have been sold to a new collection agency.
In most cases, the easiest way to determine the health of your credit is to look at your credit score, a numerical value that reflects a mathematical analysis of your debt, your payment history, the existence of liens or other judgments, and other statistical data collected by the credit bureaus. In other words, your credit score is the compact, simplified version of your entire credit history, all rolled up into one tidy three-digit number.
Checking your own credit score will not impact it in anyway positively or negatively. There is a difference between doing a soft credit check, which is what utility companies, landlords, or cell phone companies may do to see if you qualify for perks such as not having to pay a downpayment, and other types of credit checks that lenders usually do, which are called hard credit inquiries. Hard credit inquiries will typically reduce your score by a slight amount, but only temporarily until you start paying your loan.

In today’s banking environment, the decision to offer you a mortgage or grant you a credit card sometimes comes down to one simple thing: your credit score. Based on information in your credit report (no, they are not the same thing), this numerical rating provides an easy way to assess your risk of defaulting on a loan. No wonder, then, that consumers are eager to find out their score – and if possible, for free.
There are three major credit agencies that provide consumer credit information (including credit scores) to the majority of interested parties: Equifax, Experian, and Transunion. Each reporting agency collects information about your credit history from a variety of sources, including lenders, landlords, and employers, as well as other sources. These includes public records, current and past loans, your payment history, and other data. They then rate your performance using a proprietary scoring system to come up with a credit score.
Unfortunately, identity theft is a very real threat to everyone. Even if you don’t keep an eye on your credit reports every other week, that’s OK because monitoring your score can help you make sure your identity isn’t being fraudulently used - a drastic change in your score can indicate that something may be wrong and help you keep track of how your sensitive information is being used.
There are a lot of myths out there about credit scoring – hopefully we can help you understand FICO scoring, so you can take action to build your score. There are five major components FICO uses to determine a credit score. Fortunately, understanding the secret sauce can help you build a strong score and healthy credit report. Both a 700+ score and healthy credit report will help keep the rest of your financial life cheaper by enabling you to get lower interest rates on loans and approved for top-tier financial products.
It’s been only a year since I opened my first card last September, and I already have a solid FICO score – 720, the last time I checked.  That’s not a perfect score by any means, but it lands me safely in the “good” credit range, meaning I probably won’t have trouble getting approved for new credit in the future. I still have work to do if I want to get into the “very good” credit category, which starts at 740, according to MyFICO, but for a credit card newbie I’m not disappointed in my progress so far. 
If it’s been a long time since you checked your credit report, there’s a good chance it contains incorrect or outdated information. Eighty percent of credit reports contain bad information, according to Deborah McNaughton, founder of Professional Credit Counselors. Common credit report errors include wrong birth dates, misspelled names and incorrect account details. It can take 30 to 45 days to get your credit report corrected.
The annual free credit report that you get from the major credit bureaus is different from the free credit report card that Credit Sesame provides its users. The main difference is the amount of information provided in the free yearly credit report that you get every year as part of the fair credit reporting act. The 3 credit reports you can get every year come from TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian.
Be patient – After reviewing your reason codes you may realize that a plan to rebuild your scores may take longer than you’d like. A low score caused by delinquencies will take time to rebuild because delinquencies stay on your credit files for years. However, as these delinquencies age, their impact on your scores will lessen and your scores will increase as long as you now manage your credit well and pay accounts on time.
Be patient – After reviewing your reason codes you may realize that a plan to rebuild your scores may take longer than you’d like. A low score caused by delinquencies will take time to rebuild because delinquencies stay on your credit files for years. However, as these delinquencies age, their impact on your scores will lessen and your scores will increase as long as you now manage your credit well and pay accounts on time.
Cookies and Similar Technologies. We, our service providers, and/or non-affiliated Third-parties, may use "cookies" or similar technologies, such as local storage, on the Site. Cookies are data that a web server transfers to an individual's computer for recordkeeping purposes. Cookies are an industry standard used by many websites, and can facilitate your ongoing access to and use of a particular website; cookies do not cause damage to your computer systems or files. We use cookies or similar technologies to collect and store information for customizing user experiences and to track visitor usage on the Site. If you do not want information collected through the use of cookies, there are simple procedures in most browsers that allow you to delete existing cookies and local storage, automatically decline cookies, or to be given the choice of declining or accepting the transfer of a particular cookie, or cookies from a particular website, to your computer. Additionally, please see the "Your Choices" section below for instructions on how to opt-out of sharing certain information related to the use of cookies.

The content on MoneyCrashers.com is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional financial advice. Should you need such advice, consult a licensed financial or tax advisor. References to products, offers, and rates from third party sites often change. While we do our best to keep these updated, numbers stated on this site may differ from actual numbers. We may have financial relationships with some of the companies mentioned on this website. Among other things, we may receive free products, services, and/or monetary compensation in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products or services. We strive to write accurate and genuine reviews and articles, and all views and opinions expressed are solely those of the authors.
A credit score is a number that rates your credit risk at one point in time. It can help creditors determine whether to give you credit, decide the terms you are offered, or the rate you will pay for the loan. Having a high score can benefit you in many ways, including making it easier for you to obtain a loan, rent an apartment, and lower your insurance rate.
Service Providers. We work with third parties who provide services including but not limited to data analysis, order fulfillment, list enhancement and other administrative services. We may disclose personal information to such third parties for the purpose of enabling these third parties to provide services to us. Such services may include: marketing distribution, email list management services, advertising, certain product functionalities, customer support, web hosting, customer data management and enhancement, fulfillment services (e.g., companies that fill product orders or coordinate mailings), research and surveys, data analysis and email service.
Information That You Voluntarily Provide. We also collect non-personal information (e.g., your geographic location, etc.) when you voluntarily provide such information to us. When such information is not combined with any personal information, such information is considered to be non-personal information, as it does not personally identify you or any other user. Additionally, we may aggregate personal information in a manner such that the end-product does not personally identify you or any other user of the Site, for example, by using personal information to calculate the percentage of our users who have a particular telephone area code. Such aggregate information is considered non-personal information for purposes of this Policy.
According to the Austrian Data Protection Act, consumers must opt-in for the use of their private data for any purpose. Consumers can also withhold permission to use the data later, making illegal any further distribution or use of the collected data.[6] Consumers also have the right to receive a free copy of all data held by credit bureaus once a year.[7] Wrong or unlawfully collected data must be deleted or corrected.[8]
A: A credit reporting company can report most accurate negative information for seven years and bankruptcy information for 10 years. There is no time limit on reporting information about crimi­nal convictions; information reported in response to your application for a job that pays more than $75,000 a year; and information reported because you’ve applied for more than $150,000 worth of credit or life insurance. Information about a lawsuit or an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, which­ever is longer.
×