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Under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) the credit bureaus may not discriminate under any factors such as race, color, religion, sex, age, or national origin. Although they can ask you for most or all of this information in the process of applying for credit they may not use it to determine whether to give you the credit or the terms under which it is given.
A credit score is a statistical number that evaluates a consumer's creditworthiness and is based on credit history. Lenders use credit scores to evaluate the probability that an individual will repay his or her debts. A person's credit score ranges from 300 to 850, and the higher the score, the more financially trustworthy a person is considered to be.
Credit.com pulls your credit information every 14 days from Experian, one of the three major credit bureaus. We also pull your Vantage 3.0 score and when you sign up, you have the option of purchasing your FICO score and all three credit reports from Experian, Trans Union, and Equifax (but you are entitled to a free report once a year through annualcreditreport.com).
If you’re hesitant for your teen to open their own credit card, adding them as an authorized user on your credit card account may be the best option. You can easily monitor their spending through statements and online banking. While they piggyback off your credit, you can continue to benefit from the same perks your card offers and even earn rewards on their purchases — if you have a rewards card.
A good credit score ranges from 700 to 749 according to the FICO credit range while on a Vantage Score 3.0 you would end up at a B grade. You can check your credit score for free with Credit Sesame to see whether you fall inside the ‘good’ credit range. If you find yourself below the ‘good’ range then you can do several important actions to get yourself back up. First pay your bills on time, watch your balances, don’t go overboard applying for credit, live within your means, mix up your accounts, and finally, look into the future – credit history counts. With a good credit score range you will get a lot of great perks when it comes to applying for credit such as credit cards or loans.

The VantageScore was developed by the three credit reporting companies -- Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion -- whereas FICO scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation, hence the term FICO. They are two different scoring models, but both FICO and VantageScore issue scores ranging from 300 to 850. A difference between the two is the fact that FICO requires at least six months of credit history and at least one account reported within the last six months in order to be able to establish your credit score, whereas VantageScore only requires one month of history and one account reported within the past two years. You can read on about the further differences between the two here: https://wallethub.com/edu/vantage-score-vs-fico-score/36859/. Furthermore, you can see where your credit stands according to the VantageScore 3.0 model by signing up for a free WalletHub account. To begin, go here: https://wallethub.com/free-credit-score/.
LUCAS- Each credit bureau has a different range of points so you have to know what that credit bureaus range is before saying 700 is good. For our credit union, anything over 750 with Experian is considered Excellent (850 being the max score) and you will get the best loan rates. If you are one point under 750, you would get the next tier's rate which would affect your payment slightly, but not by much.
If you don’t pay a medical bill or a cell phone bill, your account may be referred to a collection agency. Once it is with an agency, they can register that debt with the credit bureau, which can have a big negative impact on your score. Most negative information will stay on your credit bureau for 7 years. Positive information will stay on your credit bureau forever, so long as you keep the account open. If you close an account with positive information, then it will typically stay on your report for about 10 years, until that account completely disappears from your credit bureau and score. If you don’t use your credit card (and therefore no payment is due), your score will not improve. You have to use credit in order to get a good score.

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Chua had an 850 score for about two months, he says, but it dropped to the 800s because he applied for a few rewards cards. Trying to get multiple cards in a fairly short period is interpreted as a sign of potential financial trouble, but if you’re looking for a big-ticket item like a mortgage, scoring algorithms will assume you’re only trying to buy one house when several lenders check you out.
In the eyes of lenders, employers, insurance agents, and a host of other people and entities, the state of your credit represents how responsible and even how ethical you are. For example, lenders look at your credit score to determine not only your ability, but your willingness to repay a loan. Insurance companies view an individual with a good credit score as someone who is trustworthy and less likely to commit insurance fraud. Even many employers run a credit check to determine if a candidate is likely to be a responsible employee. (However, it should be noted that employers only have access to a modified version of your credit report which omits some personal information including your account numbers and year of birth.)
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2. Tell the creditor or other information provider in writing that you dispute an item. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a credit reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if you are correct — that is, if the information is found to be inaccurate — the information provider may not report it again.
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