free-credit-report

FICO does offer a package called Score Watch, which is basically a 30-day free trial. When you sign up for Score Watch, you get a free FICO score and credit report. You will eventually be charged if you don't cancel, however, FICO will continuously remind you over the course of the 30 days that your free subscription is running out, so hopefully you won't end up forgetting.

The actual number of points that an inquiry is worth is a closely guarded secret. However, it’s safe to say that only those who are “excessively” shopping for credit will be seriously damaging their scores. The moral of this story is to shop and apply for credit only when you need it and, optimally, only after you have gotten your credit and scores in good order.
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Watch out for the upsell! The legislation only requires the credit bureaus to provide a free copy of your credit report, not a free copy of your credit score. The credit bureaus are more than happy to give you a copy of your credit score if you are willing to pay for it. TransUnion owns the company TrueCredit, and you have the option of purchasing your credit score for $5.95. I checked my score about a year ago, and haven’t had any major changes in credit, so I declined – I’m only interested in my credit report at this time.
The VantageScore was developed by the three credit reporting companies -- Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion -- whereas FICO scores are developed by Fair Isaac Corporation, hence the term FICO. They are two different scoring models, but both FICO and VantageScore issue scores ranging from 300 to 850. A difference between the two is the fact that FICO requires at least six months of credit history and at least one account reported within the last six months in order to be able to establish your credit score, whereas VantageScore only requires one month of history and one account reported within the past two years. You can read on about the further differences between the two here: https://wallethub.com/edu/vantage-score-vs-fico-score/36859/. Furthermore, you can see where your credit stands according to the VantageScore 3.0 model by signing up for a free WalletHub account. To begin, go here: https://wallethub.com/free-credit-score/.
Only one website is authorized to fill orders for the free annual credit report you are entitled to under law — annualcreditreport.com. Other websites that claim to offer “free credit reports,” “free credit scores,” or “free credit monitoring” are not part of the legally mandated free annual credit report program. In some cases, the “free” product comes with strings attached. For example, some sites sign you up for a supposedly “free” service that converts to one you have to pay for after a trial period. If you don’t cancel during the trial period, you may be unwittingly agreeing to let the company start charging fees to your credit card.
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