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In general, creditors forward information to the credit reporting agencies monthly. The day of the month that each individual creditor sends updates varies. In other words, we might receive an update from creditor A on the first of every month and from creditor B on the 11th of every month, etc. This is why it's important to have access to your credit report every day.
Unfortunately, identity theft is a very real threat to everyone. Even if you don’t keep an eye on your credit reports every other week, that’s OK because monitoring your score can help you make sure your identity isn’t being fraudulently used - a drastic change in your score can indicate that something may be wrong and help you keep track of how your sensitive information is being used.
But don't just choose any credit repair service. Meeting with a local California credit repair office isn't always the best choice. These independent credit repair professionals often can't show the same record of success as a more experienced credit repair company. Working with experienced, trustworthy attorneys who understand consumer protection laws is a better way to make sure your credit report remains fair and accurate.

According to the Austrian Data Protection Act, consumers must opt-in for the use of their private data for any purpose. Consumers can also withhold permission to use the data later, making illegal any further distribution or use of the collected data.[6] Consumers also have the right to receive a free copy of all data held by credit bureaus once a year.[7] Wrong or unlawfully collected data must be deleted or corrected.[8]
Have you ever wondered how using your credit affects your credit score? With so many misconceptions about carrying balances month to month, this can be confusing. Your credit utilization, or how much of your credit you use, makes up 30% of your credit score. Interested in paying down those high balances? Let us show you how by coming up with a personalized game plan. See it now »
No matter where you live in California, bad credit can limit your ability to get a mortgage or car loan. California has long been one of the country's most expensive and competitive home markets. Even borrowers with good credit can struggle to afford the state's median home price of $393,000. With a 20 percent down payment, you'd need to make $78,000 to afford a median-priced home in California, more than what two-thirds of households make in the state. When you add in the high interest rates of a mortgage for someone with poor credit, that home could be well out of reach.
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A: Under federal law, you’re entitled to a free report if a company takes adverse action against you, such as denying your application for credit, insurance, or employment, and you ask for your report within 60 days of receiving notice of the action. The notice will give you the name, address, and phone number of the credit reporting company. You’re also entitled to one free report a year if you’re unemployed and plan to look for a job within 60 days; if you’re on welfare; or if your report is inaccurate because of fraud, including identity theft. Otherwise, a credit reporting company may charge you a reasonable amount for another copy of your report within a 12-month period.
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