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No matter where you live in California, bad credit can limit your ability to get a mortgage or car loan. California has long been one of the country's most expensive and competitive home markets. Even borrowers with good credit can struggle to afford the state's median home price of $393,000. With a 20 percent down payment, you'd need to make $78,000 to afford a median-priced home in California, more than what two-thirds of households make in the state. When you add in the high interest rates of a mortgage for someone with poor credit, that home could be well out of reach.
If your credit score is above 800, you have an exceptionally long credit history that is unmarred by things such as late payments, collections accounts, liens, judgments, or bankruptcies. Not only do you have multiple established lines of credit, but you have or have had experience with several different types of credit, including installment loans and revolving lines of credit. You generally have a stable work history, usually with one company.

Score providers, such as the three major credit bureaus -- Equifax, Experian and TransUnion -- and companies like FICO use different types of credit scoring models and may use different information to calculate credit scores. Credit scores provided by the three major credit bureaus will also vary because some lenders may report information to all three, two or one, or none at all.  And lenders and creditors may use additional information, other than credit scores, to decide whether to grant you credit. 


Credit scores are three-digit numbers created using the information in credit reports. That information is used to try to predict how likely you are to pay your bills on time.  While you have only three credit reports (at least from the major, national agencies), there are many different types of credit scores that can be calculated based on your credit information.
Credit reports include a list of businesses that have recently checked your credit history either as a result of an application you made or a promotional screening. These credit checks are known as inquiries. Your version of your credit report will show inquiries from everyone who's pulled your credit report, including businesses who look at your report for promotional purposes. A lender's version of your credit report only shows the inquiries that were made when you put in some type of application.
A: You need to provide your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth. If you have moved in the last two years, you may have to provide your previous address. To maintain the security of your file, each nationwide credit reporting company may ask you for some information that only you would know, like the amount of your monthly mortgage payment. Each company may ask you for different information because the information each has in your file may come from different sources.
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