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None of the other banks approved my applications, and my score went down from the very beginning due to the number of “hard inquiries” against my report. Hard inquiries occur when lenders check your credit report before they make lending decisions, and having too many inquiries in a short period of time can result in several dings to your credit score. 

FICO does offer a package called Score Watch, which is basically a 30-day free trial. When you sign up for Score Watch, you get a free FICO score and credit report. You will eventually be charged if you don't cancel, however, FICO will continuously remind you over the course of the 30 days that your free subscription is running out, so hopefully you won't end up forgetting.
I'm curious about how WalletHub claims to update daily. I have been logging in every day and checking for a credit card to update to show that it has been paid off. It would say the same balance every day except for today when the balance suddenly updated with a 0 balance "as of 5 days ago". If it updated 5 days ago then why wasn't it showing when I was checking within the last 5 days? The same is true for several other credit cards I have too. Thank you!

If you’ve recently gone through a bankruptcy, foreclosure, or even a civil judgment, it probably isn’t a surprise to you that your credit has been impacted. Any abrupt changes to your credit can seriously affect the number that shows on your credit report. Unfortunately, unlike the scenarios listed in previous points, these derogatory marks are the result of what lenders consider major delinquencies –– in other words, significant implications about your ability to manage your finances.
AnnualCreditReport.com is the only federally mandated and authorized source for obtaining a free credit report. The Federal Trade Commission cautions consumers to be aware of "impostor" websites that have similar names or are deliberate misspellings of the real name.[2] Such impostor websites include websites with titles like FreeCreditScore.com.[5]

The collection industry is far from perfect. Collection accounts are bought and sold. Errors proliferate. Sellers should cease reporting, but rarely do, leaving a trail of duplicate accounts. Many debts are past the reporting period limits for the credit bureaus. And a surprising number of collection letters are sent to the wrong people altogether.
If you've never had a credit card or loan, you probably won't have a score. And people who haven't used credit in years can become "credit invisible." You are likely to have a VantageScore® before you have a FICO® Score. That's because VantageScore® uses alternative data — such as rent or utility payments, if they're reported to the bureaus — and looks back 24 months for activity. FICO® 8, the scoring model most widely used in lending decisions, looks back only six months and doesn't use alternative data.
help guard against identity theft. That’s when someone uses your personal information — like your name, your Social Security number, or your credit card number — to commit fraud. Identity thieves may use your information to open a new credit card account in your name. Then, when they don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report. Inaccurate information like that could affect your ability to get credit, insurance, or even a job.
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